Saturday, April 18, 2009

Geocaching on the Mason Rail Trail, NH

Compared to Long Island, north-central Massachusetts and southern New Hampshire offer plentiful opportunities for mountain biking, hiking as well as geocaching. One of those opportunities is the the Mason Rail Trail, which starts at the MA/NH border and continues north before turning west.  We were eager to take an easy walk in a fairly secluded place, while doing some geocaching and giving Curie a chance to run around. Curie is a shitzu/poodle mix that we were dog-sitting that weekend.
The gate on the north side of Depot Road.
The gate on the north side of Depot Road.

DYI Kitchen spice rack

Over the years we have accumulated quite a collection of spices. Starting with asafoetida (or hing, if you insist), through berbere and cardamom pods (both green and black) to vanilla and yellow mustard - it was all in there, stuffed several rows deep in a cabinet. An unfortunate  consequence of this arrangement is that every time we needed a bottle of spice that was not in the first row we had to rummage through everything and inadvertently drop some of them on the counter.

Saturday, April 11, 2009

Images of Niagara Falls and Southern Ontario (August, 2007)

To conclude the summer of 2007 we drove across the New York State to visit Niagara Falls, and to a limited extent southern shores of Lake Ontario. In Niagara Falls we met up with Francis and Lisa and visited most attractions in the area, including both American and Canadian Falls, Cave of the Winds, the Maid of the Mist, Walk behind the Falls, etc, etc. Soon enough me and Andi got fed up with the tourists, crossed the border into Canada and visited the historic Fort George south of Niagara-ON-the-Lake, and  St. Catherines on the shores of Lake Ontario. The complete photogallery is available in my Picasa photoalbum.

Maid of the Mist battling the currents under the Horseshoe (Canadian) Falls - (Niagara Falls, ON, Canada) (22mm; f/18; 1/250s; ISO200)
Maid of the Mist battling the currents under the Horseshoe (Canadian) Falls - (Niagara Falls, ON, Canada) (22mm; f/18; 1/250s; ISO200).

Orphaned Kitten (07/2008)

In July 2008 my friend Harris stumbled upon an orphaned little kitten while walking on the Stony Brook University's campus. He took the kitten into his care and eventually adopted it. Her name is Mac and in these pictures, she is only several weeks old.

Orphaned Kitten (85mm;f/5.6;1/15s;ISO1600)



















Images of Slovakia (06/2007)

All photographs were taken during our trip to Slovakia in the summer of 2007. With Francis, Lisa and Andi we have covered several touristy spots around the country: Banska Stiavnica, Pieniny National Park, The Spis Castle, Mala Fatra National Park, Demanova Cave of Liberty, and many many more. The entire photo gallery from the trip can be seen in my Picasa photo album.

All photos taken with Canon Digital Rebel with a Canon EF-S 17-85 mm f/4.0-5.6 IS USM lens. Shot into RAW and post-processed. Click on the images to see a larger version. All images on this page are copyrighted and may not be used without permission.

Zilina and the Vah river (Slovakia) at Sunset
Zilina and the Vah river (Slovakia) at Sunset (41mm; f/5; 1/20s; ISO200)

The National Mall at Night (Washington, DC) (09/2007)

All photographs taken in September 2007 at the District of Columbia's National Mall. It was a clear crispy night with pretty strong winds which forced me to shield my camera positioned on a pretty flimsy tripod.

All photos taken with Canon Digital Rebel with a Canon EF-S 17-85 mm f/4.0-5.6 IS USM lens.  Shot into RAW and post-processed. Click on the images to see a larger version.  All images on this page are copyrighted and may not be used without permission.

The Lincoln Memorial and the Reflecting Pool at Night (66mm;f/10;10s;ISO200)
The Lincoln Memorial and the Reflecting Pool (66mm;f/10;10s;ISO200)

Wednesday, April 1, 2009

A definition of real geologists

This is an entertaining description of real geologists. I have no idea who authored this but I got a copy of this during 1998 excursion to Bulgaria (and it's ore deposits). This article was posted on the wall in the chief geologist's office in one of the many mines we visited that summer. It's in particular offensive to geophysicists. Quite obviously I don't identify with this pamphlet but find it funny nonetheless. Enjoy.
  • Don't eat quiche. They don't even know what it is. Real geologists eat raw meat, bear and tonsil-killer chilli.
  • Don't need hammers. They break samples off with their bare hands.
  • Don't sit in offices. Being indoors makes me crazy. If they'd wanted to sit in offices they'd have become geophysicists.
  • Don't need geophysicists. Geophysicists measure things nobody can see or feel, make up a whole lot of numbers about them, then drill in all the wrong places.
  • Don't go to meetings, except to point at the map and say "Drill here!" and leave.
  • Don't work from 9 to 5. If any real geologists are around at 9 am it is because they are going to a meeting to tell the managers where to drill.
  • Don't like managers. Managers are necessary evil for dealing with bozos from Human Resources, bean counter from Accounting and other mental defectives.
  • Don't make exploration budgets. Only insecure mama's boys try to stay within exploration budgets. Real geologists ignore exploration budgets.
  • Don't use compasses. That smacks of geophysics. Real geologists always know where they are and the direction of the nearest place where beer is available.
  • Don't make maps. Maps are for novices, the forgetful, managers and pansies who like to play with colored pencils.
  • Don't write reports. Bureaucrats write reports and look what they are like.
  • Don't have joint venture partners. Partners are for wimpy bedwetters who are unable to think big
  • Don't use computers. Computers are for geophysicists. other nerds and limp-wristed quiche-eaters who can't think for themselves.